Don't Get Around Much Anymore

Composed by
Duke Ellington
Arranged by
Jock McKenzie
Price
£ 25.00 

Don't Get Around Much Anymore is a jazz standard written by Duke Ellington. The song was originally entitled Never No Lament and was first recorded by Duke Ellington and his orchestra in May 1940. It quickly became a hit after Bob Russell wrote the lyrics in 1942, reaching No. 1 in the US R&B charts in 1943.

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  • 4 Trumpets
  • 1 Horn in F
  • 3 Trombones
  • 1 Euphonium (or Trombone)
  • 1 Tuba
  • 1 Drum Kit
  • All Alternative Brass Parts Included

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Description


Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington (1899–1974) was an American composer, pianist and jazz orchestra leader, which he led from 1923 until his death over a career spanning more than six decades. Born in Washington, D.C., Ellington was based in New York City from the mid-1920s onward and gained a national profile through his orchestra's appearances at the Cotton Club in Harlem. In the 1930s, his orchestra toured Europe. Although widely considered to have been a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, Ellington embraced the phrase "beyond category" as a liberating principle and referred to his music as part of the more general category of American Music rather than to a musical genre such as jazz. Some of the jazz musicians who were members of Ellington's orchestra, such as saxophonist Johnny Hodges, are considered to be among the best players in the idiom. Ellington melded them into the best-known orchestral unit in the history of jazz. Some members stayed with the orchestra for several decades. A master at writing miniatures for the three-minute 78 rpm recording format, Ellington wrote more than one thousand compositions; his extensive body of work is the largest recorded personal jazz legacy. Ellington also recorded songs written by his bandsmen, for example Juan Tizol's "Caravan", and "Perdido", which brought a Spanish tinge to big band jazz. In the early 1940s, Ellington began a nearly thirty-year collaboration with composer-arranger-pianist Billy Strayhorn, whom he called his writing and arranging companion. With Strayhorn, he composed many extended compositions and suites. Ellington was noted for his inventive use of the orchestra and for his eloquence and charisma. His reputation continued to rise after he died and he was awarded a posthumous Pulitzer Prize Special Award for music in 1999

“Just wanted to give a general shout-out to SUPERBRASS - who are truly super-bad; for my money, one of the most exciting large brass ensembles EVER.”

Rex Richardson
International Trumpet Soloist

“Wow! What a great CD. The playing is superb”

Dr. Robert Childs
Musical Director, Cory Band

“One of the all time great brass recordings OF ALL TIME”

Jiggs Whigham
International Jazz Trombone Soloist and Musical Director, BBC Big Band

“Wow! What a great CD. The playing is superb”

Dr. Robert Childs
Musical Director, Cory Band

"Who but the best professionals could live up to this ?... Everything about this disc is to be recommended, the recording is crystal clear and the playing and arranging of the first water”

Dr. Paul Sarcich
www.mvdaily.com

“Every now and again a recording that is both truly outstanding and will have great appeal to brass band listeners appears on the shelves. We are delighted to make it the first recipient of our CD of the Year Editors Award.”

Kenneth Crookston
British Bandsman

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